Ketamine brings about rapid improvement in OCD symptoms, Paid Study

28 May 2017 - 18:56

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Get paid $400 to be in this study.

https://med.stanford.edu/rodriguezlab/research/ocd-research/current-clinical-studies/mket-study.html

This study builds on our discovery that a potent NMDA receptor antagonist, ketamine, has rapid (hours) and robust therapeutic effects in OCD and will help us understand how ketamine works to relieve repetitive thoughts and behaviours. 

Purpose: To understand how new drug brings about rapid improvement in OCD symptoms.

This clinical study is funded by the  by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and is listed in clinicaltrials.gov.

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This post has been thanked 1 time. 29 May 2017 - 22:52

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Hi Orwell

I'm wondering if this might be something that would be used in the future as something that could help the ocd. I do hear that it is a powerful medication and could maybe be dangerous.  It can be interesting seeing different studies of the medication and thinking more about it maybe it could help people with the ocd.

I don't know too much about Ketamine myself but I feel it is always good to investigate things and hoping if they do try it for ocd that it would work. I have heard that there can be a lot of side effects with it as well. There will be a lot of things they are looking for with the study I believe.

 

30 May 2017 - 0:21

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Yes, it can also reverse depression instantly, but temporarily. 

This post has been thanked 1 time. 31 May 2017 - 6:16

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There is a psychiatrist in the South East of England who's running a ketamine programme for depression:

https://www.psych.ox.ac.uk/team/rupert-mcshane

I'm very interested in the use of psychedelics to treat these kinds of problems. But ketamine is addictive and also affects the bladder - you don't have to look far online to find horror stories of incontinence and people urinating blood and jelly (yes, jelly).

He was probably forced to use ketamine because it is a more politically correct drug i.e. it has established uses as a painkiller and an anaesthetic. I think something like LSD or psilocybin would work just as well and without the horrific side effects. When I took LSD at 14 my depression lifted for three years!

I hope these drugs are decriminalised soon.

The other consideration is that people who are into psychedelics are often also into the occult. So I'd be concerned that the doctors might want to use the suggestible state of tripping patients to impress occult beliefs on them. This actually happened a lot when LSD was legal.

Still, very interesting. I'd love to hear anyone's stories about how psychedelics have affected their OCD/depression etc..

31 May 2017 - 17:35

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'This clinical study is funded by the  by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and is listed in clinicaltrials.gov.'

 

So it's got US Government approval.

3 June 2017 - 11:30

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Lots of recreational drugs can "instantly and temporarily reverse depression" lol.

Feeling good for a short period is not "reversing depression."

3 June 2017 - 17:49

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Yes,but it gives the doctors time to get the person to a better state, give therapy, etc.

3 June 2017 - 20:08

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So we're classifying drugs according to how fun they are? Like antidepressants/antipsychotics/anxiolytics are okay as medicines because they're "only a bit fun" but things like ketamine/LSD or even codeine are "a lot of fun" therefore they're "bad"? So a drug can only be said to work if it doesn't work?

The ancient Greeks used opium to treat "melancholy" and the practice continued for thousands of years, indeed up until the 1950s IIRC.

3 June 2017 - 23:42

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^ Who is that addressed at? I don't have a problem with people using recreational drugs occasionally, if they know what there doing know themselves well in that regard.

I'm just saying it's very different than reversing depression.

 

3 June 2017 - 23:48

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Also starting recreational drug use with Ketamine (especially when you have mental health issues) sounds like a terrible idea.

4 June 2017 - 0:10

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Hi Edward,

It was addressed at you, sorry if I offended, sorry for being confrontational.

I was just pointing out that whether something is considered recreational or therapeutic (or both) is pretty much entirely dependent on the surrounding culture.

Also, ketamine relieves the symptoms for many days, and, as I said earlier, LSD lifted my depression for several years.

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