curiuos

8 October 2014 - 17:51

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If someone acted out an ocd thought like if they were thinking unclearly even though thats not their true identity does that make them a terrible person? Just curious

8 October 2014 - 23:39

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Hi Ocd disaster

Hows things been yourself?

Sorry if this a trigger but I did act on my thoughts in the past, it was thoughts telling me to stick a pencil into a wire and I did it. (It made me feel terrible and it got to the stage I was doing it around the house, I know this sounds crazy) I was only 13 at the time, oh man those days were tough because I didn't know what to make of my mind.

Personally I wouldn't label anyone as terrible for acting out, I would probably shed a tear knowing that his or her mental illness got the better of them and thinking to myself it's not their true desires but it was the illness that made them act out. (Remember of course, you are not your thoughts)

What do others think?

Graeme

9 October 2014 - 14:09

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Thanks for the reply and the crazy thing about it is they say people who have ocd never act on their thoughts but i've read tons of post from people on here who said they have acted on their thoughts.

9 October 2014 - 14:26

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When I saw my therapist they said its as likely to win the lottery as it is to act on your thoughts. 99.9% of people will NEVER act on their thoughts. This thread could worry people to death Incase they do act on their thoughts.

9 October 2014 - 14:52

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Hi Ocd disaster (Hope you are doing okay today)

I think there are deeper reasons to why someone might act out, don't mean to cause anyone any stress it's extremely rare to do it because the ocd has told you to do it. One example I could probably think of is someone on the other ocd forum was saying he or she did act out on a ocd thought and felt very guilty but there is a massive but and that is it was the testing phase that made them act out and it was not their (true desires). Thank goodness I don't think anyone was hurt

The reason why he or she acted out was only because they were testing to see if it was their true desires but I don't think it was the ocd itself as such.

(Now thinking back to why I acted out on the thoughts by sticking the pencil into the wires, I honestly think it was the way I was thinking, I'll give you an example, anything that I started to think about I had to act out on and one example was to do with taking deep breaths because I thought about doing it I had to do it. (It was a scary time in my life to be honest).

A sort of disclaimer type of thing, it's extremely rare for someone to act out on their thoughts because the ocd has told them to.

Your therapist is spot on with what they were saying there.

Hope everyone is okay.

9 October 2014 - 16:29

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Trying to enjoy my bday today been having hard times lately

9 October 2014 - 19:38

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Hi OCD disaster. In my case I don't even need to act on my thoughts to feel like I'm a terrible person and guilty. My OCD thoughts themselves always contain an element of condemnation, fear of being punished, and it's actually a feeling of shame about not being good enough. It's bizarre but that's my experience. I believe that having OCD shows how sensitive we are as people.

I believe that I am not my OCD thoughts. I am me with a brain that is kind of not working as I want so these thoughts are just random firings of energy and not to be taken seriously. I can think lots of stuff, does not mean I will do it because deep down I kind of 'know' it's not really me. This does not stop the OCD but helps me get a handle on me is not my ocd. It's just a symptom of my head not working properly.

take care

call me Al.

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